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Cornell Program on Applied Demographics

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Cornell Program on Applied Demographics with Cornell Institute for Food Systems Industry Partnership Program Food and Beverage Manufacturing in the Empire State - Chart Book - 2015 October, 2016. 62 pages.

This chart book provides insights regarding the supply and demand for labor in New York State’s Food and Beverage manufacturing industries.

In New York State the Food and Beverage Manufacturing industry accounts for more than 1-out-of-8 jobs in Manufacturing. The industry has been a bright spot in the post-Recession economy as the number of jobs have not only recovered but now exceed the pre-Recession peaks. The industry is on pace to exceed in 2022 the up-beat forecasts prepared in 2012 by the New York State Department of Labor. For continued growth in Food and Beverage Manufacturing a supply of appropriately skilled workers is required. The focus of this chart book is to profile for New York State and its Economic Development Regions characteristics of the current workforce, identify who the new hires are, and provide basic demographics on the supply of future workers.

Jan Vink, Cornell Program on Applied Demographics. Highlights of the US Census Bureau 2015 Estimates of County Population Characteristics. June, 2016. 6 pages.

On June 23, 2016 the U.S. Census Bureau released the Vintage 2015 population characteristics estimates for counties. This document highlights these numbers and some of the trends in New York State.

Jan Vink, Cornell Program on Applied Demographics. 2015 County and Economic Development Regions Population Estimates. March, 2016. 33 pages.

On March 24, 2016 the U.S. Census Bureau released the Vintage 2015 total population estimates for counties and metro- and micropolitan areas. This document highlights these numbers and some of the trends in New York State, its ten Economic Regions and its counties. With references, map, tables, charts.

Jan Vink, Cornell Program on Applied Demographics. 2014 County and Economic Development Regions Population Estimates. March, 2015. 33 pages.

On March 26, 2015 the U.S. Census Bureau released the Vintage 2014 total population estimates for counties and metro- and micropolitan areas. This document highlights these numbers and some of the trends in New York State, its ten Economic Regions and its counties. With references, map, tables, charts.

Jan Vink, Cornell Program on Applied Demographics. A comparison between the New York and Florida populations. November, 2014.

At the end of the year the Census Bureau releases new Nation and State total population estimates. Last year the population sizes in New York and Florida were very close and many speculate that this year Florida will take over the number 3 spot from New York in the ranking by population size. This web publication compares population size, components of change (births, deaths and migration) and characteristics (age and race/ethnicity) of the population. In addition some economic variables, like GDP, employment and poverty are compared between FL and NY.

Jan Vink, Cornell Program on Applied Demographics. Highlights of the US Census Bureau 2013 Estimates of County Population Characteristics. June, 2014. 5 pages.

On June 26, 2014 the U.S. Census Bureau released the Vintage 2013 population characteristics estimates for counties. This document highlights these numbers and some of the trends in New York State.

Jan Vink, Cornell Program on Applied Demographics. 2013 County and Economic Development Regions Population Estimates. March, 2014. 31 pages.

On March 27, 2014 the U.S. Census Bureau released the Vintage 2013 total population estimates for counties and metro- and micropolitan areas. This document highlights these numbers and some of the trends in New York State, its ten Economic Regions and its counties. With references, map, tables, charts.

Jan Vink, Cornell Program on Applied Demographics. Highlights of the US Census Bureau 2012 Estimates of County Population Characteristics. June, 2013. 4 pages.

On June 13, 2013 the U.S. Census Bureau released the Vintage 2012 population characteristics estimates for counties. This document highlights these numbers and some of the trends in New York State.

Joe Francis, Jan Vink, Nij Tontisirin, Sutee Anantsuksomsri and Viktor Zhong, Cornell Program on Applied Demographics. Alternative Strategies for Mapping ACS Estimates and Error of Estimation. Feb, 2012. 29 pages.

As the American Community Survey begins its second iteration with Census 2010 geographies and new vintages of 5 year ACS data become available, demographers still face quandaries about how to present such data. No consensus has evolved as to how much or how little to present. Current "practice" seems to fall into three camps: (1) present only the estimated value of some variable without any indication of sampling error, (2) present both the estimate and some measure of error surrounding the estimate, (3) present the estimate in the main report or paper and put error of estimation information in an appendix. As we try to sort through these decisions, an additional unsettled issue is in what format to present the error: via coefficient of variations, confidence bands, or estimate +/- MOE. These same dilemmas challenge those who produce maps of ACS variables, but cartographers face the additionally quandary of whether to present the estimates and their MOE (1) on separate maps, or (2) show both on the same map. A third unsettled issue is how to symbolize these on a map.

This paper presents several approaches to mapping uncertainty information that GIS scientists and analytic Cartographers have tried over the past two decades, followed by a discussion of current approaches being considered by the Census Bureau and applied demographers toward visualization of ACS data.

Jan Vink, Cornell Program on Applied Demographics. Age/sex/race in New York State - Based on Census 2010 Summary File 1. July 14 2011. 54 pages.

On July 14, 2011 the U.S. Census Bureau released the Census 2010 Summary File 1 for New York State. This data gives great detail on the population and housing as it was collected during the 2010 decennial Census. This document details some first impressions of the age/sex structures for different race/ethnicity groups in New York State and its ten Economic Regions. With references, map, tables, charts.

Robin Blakely-Armitage, Scott Sanders, Joe Francis, and Jan Vink. Upstate New York in Profile: Trends, Projections, and Community & Economic Development Issues. 2011 State of Upstate New York Initiative, June 2011

The Community & Regional Development Institute (CaRDI) and Cornell University's Program on Applied Demographics (PAD) have produced this document to serve as a resource for decision-makers at multiple levels of government and community organizations, to help leaders and decisionmakers track trends over time, examine projections, and consider public opinion on a host of emerging policy issues in key development areas of upstate New York. This chartbook integrates New York State-based survey data, Census and other secondary data sources, and provides important links to more information on several key community development topics such as energy, food systems, economic development, schools, and health care.

This document complemented the conference: State of Upstate New York Conference: Resiliency, Partnerships and Innovation, June 8-9, 2011

Joe Francis, Sutee Anantsuksomsri, Nij Tontisirin, Xiaoling Li, Jan Vink, Cornell Program on Applied Demographics. Characteristics of Housing in New York State, Mapping Key Indicators from the 2010 Census. June, 2011. 29 pages.

The 2010 Census of Population and Housing was conducted during the later phase of this cycle. Information about various housing characteristics of the population became available for New York at the state, county, town, city and Indian Reservation level in mid- May 2011 with the release of the Census 2010 Demographic Profiles. This booklet gives a detailed look at the total housing units, change in total housing units from 2000 to 2010, housing density, percent occupied, percent vacant, vacant for sale, vacant for rent and seasonal vacant units referenced to the Census date of April 1, 2010.

A high resolution version is available here (caution: 52MB)

Jan Vink, Cornell Program on Applied Demographics. The changing age composition in New York State. May 12, 2011. 35 pages.

On May 12, 2011 the U.S. Census Bureau released Census 2010 Demographic Profiles for New York State. This data gives some general age, race and household characteristics down to places and county sub divisions. Future products releases will give more insight in other demographic changes. This document details changes in the age composition in New York State in the last decade. With references, map, tables, charts.

Jan Vink, Cornell Program on Applied Demographics. Census 2010 redistricting data: First impressions for New York State. March 24, 2011. 38 pages.

On March 24, 2011 the U.S. Census Bureau released Census 2010 redistricting data for New York State. This data gives detailed race information for the total population and voting age population down to the block level. Future products releases will give more insight in other demographic changes. This document details some first impressions of the demographic changes in New York State in the last decade. With references, map, tables, charts.

Warren Brown, Cornell University, Robert Scardamalia, New York State Department of Economic Development. Using the American Community Survey (ACS) Multi-Year Estimates in State Programs: Empire Zones in Rockland County, NY. December 2007. 22 pages.

Focusing on "the use of American Community Survey results in legislative threshold based state programs", this report considers the implications of changed survey methodology with legislative language now in force. Although "this research attempts to evaluate the impact of ACS results on a specific economic development program in the State of New York... it should be viewed as an alert to state legislatures and congress to review existing statutes and reevaluate the appropriateness of their language in a world of American Community Survey data". With references, map, tables, charts.

Joseph J. Salvo, Population Division, New York City Department of City Planning; Warren A. Brown, Program on Applied Demographics, Cornell University. Population Estimates and the Needs of Local Governments. July 19, 2006. 11 pages.

The authors advocate a multi-pronged approach for Census Bureau use in developing population estimates that are vital to local governments for assessing needs and developing policies and programs. They discuss the current methodology, detailing shortcomings in the current use of "administrative records component of population change", and present alternative methods that would best serve the varying populations and situations of different communities. With bibliography, figures.

Warren Brown, Cornell University; William M. Ramage, Patrick Berkery, Thomas Corban and David Trzaskos, New York State Department of Labor; Cheryl Schaefer, Seneca County Department of Employment and Training. Labor Force Analysis for Seneca County: The Outlook for Jobs and Workers. February 1995, Revised March 1995, 86 pages.

Although developed specifically for Seneca County, NY, this report demonstrates a human resource development strategy that any county or area can use. It explores the dynamics of how local labor markets work while recognizing the “unique qualities of a specific labor market area” whereby “decision makers can replace perception of their economic reality with a set of facts”. With tables, maps, figures, bibliography.

Warren A. Brown, David L. Brown, Thomas A. Hirschl. People, Jobs, and Income: A Demographic Perspective on Nonmetropolitan and Metropolitan New York. Cornell University, July 1991, 35 pages.

It does make a difference where you live in New York State. This monograph describes and compares how residential area differences affected people, jobs and incomes from 1980 to 1990. “The persistence of these differences indicates that economic opportunity is unevenly distributed in the state. Low incomes and high unemployment remain concentrated in nonmetropolitan … and upstate metropolitan counties.” With graphs, charts, glossary, bibliography, data sources.